College-Prep Classes for Homeschooled Students!

Schola students study the subjects of a liberal arts curriculum: great books of literature and history, Latin and rhetoric, as well as science and mathematics. Through careful study of God's Word and God's World, our students are challenged to "grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ" (2 Peter 3:18) in order to serve Him and one another. With the Bible as a foundation, teachers committed to the Christian faith impart the skills of thinking and learning, equipping students to intelligently engage the world in which they live and to be "ready to make a defense to anyone who asks the reason for the hope that is in you, with gentleness and respect" (1 Peter 3:15).

Schola serves as a meeting place for Christian teachers and homeschooled students to explore the history of ideas that have shaped our culture and to use a biblical standard to evaluate those ideas. Schola teachers bring experience, enthusiasm, and a vision for home education to that process. As homeschool parents themselves, Schola teachers understand the challenges homeschool families face in providing upper-level learning experiences for middle and high school students. As teachers, they also understand the interest and synergy created by group discussions of important issues as well as the value of structure, consistency, and accountability needed to complete subject matter. Schola aims to provide these advantages to homeschool families in a forum that continues to encourage the goal of homeschooling: parental direction of education.

All Schola classes meet in Sugar Land at Providence Presbyterian Church either once or twice each week. Students complete their studies at home under parental supervision. Students may register for the complete program or individual classes.

Getting Started at Schola

Schola Homeschool Classes introduce students in Fort Bend County and Southwest Houston to the consequences of ideas in every discipline. Students (4th to 12th grade) study the subjects of a liberal arts curriculum: great books of literature and history, Latin and rhetoric, as well as science and mathematics. Schola classes teach students the skills of thinking and learning, equipping students to intelligently engage the world in which they live.

Schola Mission and Foundational Principles

Schedule Changes for 2018/2019

If you are doing any long-term planning for junior high and high school, please be aware of the schedule changes that will go into effect in August 2018.

These changes will allow us to offer five potential class sequence plans without any class conflicts.

These class sequence plans should allow most students to select a plan that best suits their abilities and be assured that they can complete a high school program at Schola without class conflicts down the road.

We look forward to implementing these changes next August (2018) not this August (2017).

Schola Class Highlights 2017/2018

Registration for the 2017/2018 Academic Year is Open at Schola!

Academic Advising
Schola Registration Forms


Curriculum Highlights at Schola

Why Study Latin?

"The study of Latin is a complete education in that it develops the intellectual powers of the mind and at the same time develops English language sklls far more effectively than English grammar, thus achieving the two most important goals of education at the same time.
"Latin, like math, gives the student the experience of studying one subject to a master level. This is what is missing in modern education. We try to teach everything and we cover too many subjects too superficially. " Read More

Connecting the Dots -- From David Quine

CONNECTING THE DOTS ~ I remember the first time I was given a book full of dots. I turned from page to page. I am sure I had a puzzled look on my face. There were so many dots and they seemed so random. What did they mean? It was all so confusing to me. I set the book to the side. It must have seemed to my parents that I was not interested. Then my brother picked up the book. I watched him. A pattern began to unfold as he started connecting the dots. Then I realized that the dots were not just some random collection. There was a pattern.

See What Parents Are Saying About Schola

Dear Schola,

Subscribe to SCHOLA RSS